Posts

Honoring Our Humanity with Mindfulness

The dehumanization that can lead to mass violence and collective suffering might be mitigated by a paradigm shift - a change in the habitual ways we relate to ourselves and the world. Mindfulness can be a part of our rehumanization.

Three Interrelated “I”s of Mindfulness Based Insight

Seeing through the lens of three interrelated "I"s is a framework that might help us awaken to the role we play individually and collectively in co-constructing our reality.

Mindfulness of Ego

Through a dedicated mindfulness practice, we are increasingly able to notice the ego at work, reduce our reactivity to ego threats, and make choices about how to respond in a way that is skillful - not just for ourselves, but for the benefit of all.

Mindfulness of Self-Dealing

A dedicated mindfulness practice can help us notice our baser instinct for self-dealing. Over time, we become more aware of our deep interconnection. We see that we are inseparable from others and from our environment, and we naturally begin to relate to the world in a way that is in alignment with the greater good.

The Tyranny of I, Me and Mine

The self is a mental construct that enables our survival and simplifies our relationship with the world. Although it's necessary for navigating the human condition, it's also the cause of much suffering. What we call the self is a dynamic interplay of interconnected experiences including the mind, the body and our interactions with the material world. Through practice, we can learn to navigate the self with greater mindfulness and self-compassion so that we can meet our experiences more skillfully.

The Power of Paradox

Mindfulness practice is filled with paradoxes - things that seems absurd or antithetical at first glance, but upon closer inspection, turn out to be true. They provide powerful lessons that things aren't always as they seem and prompt us to look more closely at our experiences.

Mindfulness of Self-Conscious Emotions: Envy

Envy is a self-conscious emotion that can cause us much pain. Through the cultivation of mindfulness, we can learn to see through the illusion of "I, me and mine" and engage in value-congruent behavior that supports our intentions for happiness and wellbeing.

Mindfulness of Self-Conscious Emotions: Pride

Though we are often encouraged to take pride in our accomplishments or the groups we associate ourselves with, this self-conscious emotion can become an obstacle and lead to suffering. Mindfulness can help us cultivate more skillful states of mind that have a greater likelihood of leading to lasting happiness.

Mindfulness of Self-Conscious Emotions

Can mindfulness help free us from the discomfort of self-consciousness? When we cultivate mindfulness and self-compassion, we can liberate ourselves from the tyranny of "I, me and mine", making space to live with greater authenticity.

Neither Praise Nor Blame

If we begin to observe ourselves and our reactions to experience, we may notice how impacted we are by our perception of others' approval or validation on the one hand, and their criticism, disapproval or rejection on the other. This can make for quite a rollercoaster ride when we care deeply, but are not fully present to the subtle workings of the mind. Mindfulness can help us have greater equanimity in the face of praise or blame.

Curating a State of Mind

A retreat I recently attended offered a great reminder that we are ultimately responsible for curating our own state of mind. Most of us are fortunate to posses the ability to select, organize, and look after the contents of mind we wish to…

Caring Without Attachment

Caring simply means kindness and concern for others, but sometimes we get this concept mixed up with emotional investment. Letting go of attachment can free us up to be truly compassionate and a dedicated mindfulness practice can give us the courage and wisdom to do so.

The I of the Storm

The practice of mindfulness can help free us from the tyranny of I, me and mine, teaching us to take things less personally, feel more connected, and respond with greater compassion and wisdom. Over time, we can learn to cultivate a quality of being that is relatively free of self-identification.