Caring Without Attachment

Caring simply means kindness and concern for others, but sometimes we get this concept mixed up with emotional investment. Letting go of attachment can free us up to be truly compassionate and a dedicated mindfulness practice can give us the courage and wisdom to do so.

The Clinging Mind

I am leaving in a few weeks to attend a Mindfulness Based Relapse Prevention (MBRP) training and my preparations have me thinking a lot about all the relentless ways in which we pursue what is wanted and avoid what is unwanted. Addictions…

Mindfulness in ACTion: Trauma-Informed Practices and Social Justice – An ACT-Based Perspective

Using Acceptance and Commitment Training (ACT) and trauma-informed mindfulness along with other research based practices in promoting efforts to prevent and heal trauma, support social justice, and foster resiliency and wellness both individually and collectively.

Being or Becoming?

Practicing mindfulness is, in some ways, similar to time lapse photography. The technique of capturing many mundane moments over time reveals previously unseen and sometimes even paradigm shifting information. In this way, we can meet the ebb and flow of the universe with greater equanimity

Why Study the Roots of Mindfulness?

Understanding history is an important way to gain wisdom, deepen understanding, and prevent the repetition of past mistakes. Seeing the world from other perspectives makes us more compassionate and flexible. Studying the roots of mindfulness brings similar benefits to practice.
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Mindfulness in ACTion: Psychological Flexibility

Mindfulness in ACTion is a monthly column by Angie Hardage, LMLP offering nuggets of wisdom and practical tools drawn from an Acceptance and Commitment Training (ACT) approach. This month's post is about the power of emotions.

The I of the Storm

The practice of mindfulness can help free us from the tyranny of I, me and mine, teaching us to take things less personally, feel more connected, and respond with greater compassion and wisdom. Over time, we can learn to cultivate a quality of being that is relatively free of self-identification.

Learning to Live in the Moment

Paul Silverman, practitioner member of the Midwest Alliance for Mindfulness shares how his mindfulness practice has helped him to live in the moment. Read how he turned a personal tragedy into an act of compassion for others.

Revolution from the Inside Out

Mindfulness can be a revolutionary act of intrinsic empowerment. Practicing mindful inquiry in the face of difficult, intense, or overwhelming experiences is an empowering way of maintaining equanimity and remaining connected to our internal wisdom.

The Practice of Retreat

There is a long tradition in the mindfulness community of "leaving one's homeland" - traveling to a quiet, secluded place away from the distractions and attachments of daily life - in order to focus exclusively on practice and reflection.

Unhacking Your Brain

Mindfulness is a skill and can be learned as a way to reclaim your power and rewire your brain for improved focus, equanimity, and emotion regulation. In the face of a culture that encourages mindlessness and reactivity, practicing mindfulness is an empowering means of asserting authorship of your psychological and emotional well-being.

The Elements of Mindfulness Practice

What distinguishes a mindfulness practice from other types of practices that support wellbeing? Its no surprise to me that mindfulness has become a household word in recent years. It is a way of living that is both elegantly simple and exceedingly powerful. When practiced skillfully, it becomes nothing less than transformative.
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Does Training Matter for Mindfulness Teachers?

Additional research is needed, but currently the data is showing that instructor training does indeed matter. Studies suggest that a higher level of Mindfulness Based Program teacher training may be linked to higher wellbeing outcomes, lower perceived stress, and greater service satisfaction among participants.
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Beginners Mind Challenge

Beginner’s mind is an attitude of openness, eagerness, and lack of preconceptions when approaching a person or a situation. It’s a useful strategy for practicing applied mindfulness and staying connected to the present moment when anxiety drags us into “what if” and future-based thinking.